Letters, signs and notices

Since re-connecting with the world via my photographic lens last year, I have begun to notice and appreciate the wit, style and beauty to be found all around us – from the most upmarket frontage to the more mundane everyday occurrence.  Here are a few of my favourites.

The Savoy London:  Does this really need any introduction?  A jewel of an Art Deco refit in 1930, the new design included the 1904 sculpture of Count Peter of Savoy (The Savoy was built on site of the Palace of Savoy) which was winched up to sit aside the new striking Savoy sign in the modish Art Deco style.  The road leading to The Savoy is still the only one in London where you drive on the right hand side of the road.

Goodwood Estate, West Sussex:  The tone of this sign strikes just the right balance of wit and warning – who wouldn’t obey this instruction because of the way in which it is couched?  It makes me smile every time I see it.  A classic.

Santa Monica Pier, California:  In 1941, the now instantly recognisable neon sign heralding the entrance to the Pier was installed by the Santa Monica Pier Businessmen’s Association to celebrate the opening of its newly-built ramp. It is today an internationally-recognised tourist destination in its own right and has become a much photographed symbol of the Southern California lifestyle.

Fairmont Pacific Rim, Vancouver, Canada:  I love the phrase that wraps repeatedly around this modern building in Vancouver and by its presence, has made the hotel the newest addition to the City of Vancouver‘s public art collection.

Internationally-acclaimed British artist Liam Gillick’s CAD 1 million public artwork literally wraps two sides of the Fairmont Pacific Rim’s façade causing pedestrians to stop and decipher the words: Lying on top of a building the clouds looked no nearer than when I was lying on the street …

Country postbox outside St Hubert’s, Idsworth:  With widespread modernisation and changes within the postal system, it is rare to find one of the original old “letter boxes” and when I come across a sighting, I cherish it.  This one lies at the entrance to St Hubert’s Idsworth, Hampshire – otherwise known as The Little Saxon Church in the middle of a Field.

Borough Market, London, SEI:  The thriving and enduring Borough Market has become one of London’s most visited food markets – and thanks to the Bridget Jones films, a bit of a film star in its own right.  This tongue in cheek map of the market just strikes the right tone – so long as you are not a vegetarian!

Roadsign on the top of Portsdown Hill:  Our last little photo is actually a cheat but no less funny for all of that.  We had to check twice to see if the sign had been tampered with – and of course it had.  It just makes me giggle – childish I know.

Contributer:  Sue Lowry

The Savoy (Fairmont Hotels & Resorts), Santa Monica CVB and Goodwood House are clients of Magellan PR.

Magellan PR is on twitter: @MagellanPR / on Facebook: MagellanPR / on Pinterest: Sue Lowry / on Google+:  Sue Lowry & MagellanPR and on Flickr: Sue Lowry.  For more information on our company, visit www.magellan-pr.com.  Follow our other blog focussing on travel in the South of England – A3 Traveller.

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About magellanstraits

Magellan Straits showcases the observations & musings from Magellan PR, a boutique travel & lifestyle agency founded in 1998. We post items that are of interest from the clients we promote and from the travels and experiences that we independently undertake.
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